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In the centre of East-Central Europe

The Łódź Region is located in the geometric centre of Poland. Location of the Voivodeship was and still is of great importance for its economic development. More than 200 years ago, industrialists from all over Europe created a powerful industrial centre in just two generations, and a small town of Łódź become the second-largest urban agglomeration in Poland.
Twenty four districts form the administrative structure of the voivodeship, and these include: 3 township districts and 21 country districts, as well as 177 communes, to include: 18 urban communes, 24 urban and rural communes and 135 rural communes.
In spite of the political, system and economic changes in Poland after 1989, the strategic connections of the voivodeship have remained unchanged. They are created by three trans-European transport routes, designating the directions of economic co-operation.

  • The North-East direction via the A-2 motorway, will give access to Russia and Moscow.
  • The North direction via the A-1 motorway, will give access to Scandinavia and Kalinigrad.
  • The West direction via the A-2 motorway through Berlin, will direct the road traffic to the routes of the Western Europe.

The region is trying to develop air services using the airports in Łódź (Lublinek) and in Łask – adaptation of a part of the military airport to the needs of the freight transport, and in the future also to the passenger transport.
The capital of the region – Łódź, a city with a special charm. Although its urban landscape was dominated by the buildings of the Reymont's "Promised Land", with chimneys, factories, and palaces built in the nineteenth century, today Łódź is the place for development of new technologies, industries and financial institutions, as well as a regional centre of culture and art.
The central Poland's most famous Piotrkowska Street, full of shops, pubs, restaurants and cafés, vibrant with concerts and exhibitions, is the pride of the inhabitants of Łódź and the tourist attraction of the region. Every year, significant events and international festivals, such as Łódź Ballet Festival and Dialogue Festival of Four Cultures, attract art lovers from all over Europe.
The Łódzkie Voivodeship, a common administrative area for the three lands with separate cultural identity – Łęczyca, Rawa and Sieradz, is particularly rich in still vivid traditions of folk art of the nationwide importance. Łódź and major cities of the region are the important cultural centres. The three art academies of Łódź and their artistic environment dominate the cultural image of the region. A multitude of exhibitions, concerts and artistic productions give a wide choice for lovers of fine arts, theatre, opera, ballet and film.
This short characteristics of the Łódzkie Voivodeship and its capital city shows its special development potential and great prospects for doing business in the very heart of Poland and the East-Central Europe. In the near future, ambitious entrepreneurs will undoubtedly create another "promised land" here, which will become a place of success for entrepreneurs from all over Europe, the same as 200 years ago.